About Arkansas Crystal

Quartz is a prevalent mineral from a global standpoint. Rock quartz can be found as far away as Tibet and China and in the United States, as close as Arkansas, Washington State, Herkimer New York and the Pecos River Valley (which runs through New Mexico and Texas). These are just a few examples; it can be found in many more places worldwide.

However, there are only three places where there is enough crystal to actually justify large-scale commercial mining. Those three places are Brazil, Madagascar, and Arkansas.

Ron Coleman's Crystal mine, Jessieville, AR

Ron Coleman’s Crystal mine, Jessieville, AR

Arkansas has some of the largest crystal beds in the world. Partially due to the folding and faulting, it was just a great place for them to grow, and grow they did.

The vibration of crystal from Arkansas is described as being different from crystal found elsewhere in the world. I have found the energy to be more clear and immediate.

Thermal waters and magnetic lodestone are two of the reasons that Arkansas crystal is different. Arkansas is a unique place, to be sure; besides the crystal mines, we have the only diamond mine which is open to the public for digging in North America (Crater of Diamonds State Park). The other diamond mine in North America is in Canada, and it is a huge commercial mining operation.

The bulk of the working crystal mines in Arkansas are located in Mount Ida and Jessieville.

About Quartz Crystal in general:

Crystal is made of Silicon dioxide. Silicon dioxide is comprised of one atom of silicon and two atoms of oxygen.Take a silica rich solution, add 250 million years or so, some heat and pressure, and violà … you have crystal!It is a daunting task to describe how old crystal really is. The entire existence of humankind is not even a blip on the radar screen in comparison.

Now we will shift focus from what crystal is made of to where they are formed.

While there are several different ways that mountains are created, the mountains in Arkansas were created by “folding” and “faulting.” In many cases, a solution rich in silicon and oxygen fills in the crevasses and cracks. The silicon and oxygen atoms join, and the resulting molecules start creating quartz crystal.

Given enough room in the crevasses and cracks, the crystals grow into points all along the walls of these spaces, which are now called veins.

After the crystal forms in the veins, clay sediment flows in and acts as sort of a packing material for the crystal.

The hardness of a crystal is measured on what is called the Moh’s scale. This is a scale that goes from one to ten with softest (number one) being talc and hardest (number ten) being diamond. Quartz ranks in at number seven on the Moh’s scale of hardness.

The clearest crystal is described as “water clear.” When crystals aren’t water clear, they are said to have inclusions. A crystal can be included with moisture or air bubbles or other minerals which get trapped inside a crystal during its growth.

Crystals are also piezoelectric (pie-EE-zoh-electric); this simply means that when a crystal is squeezed, it puts of a little bit of electricity. If you slice the crystal at certain angles and then squeeze it, it pulses at different frequencies; so, we can actually say that we are not crazy when we think we feel a vibration because rock crystal actually does have a pulse.

Understanding The Crystal People: A Handbook for Lightworkers by Genn John

This information comes out of Genn’s book… to find out much, much more about quartz crystal, get a copy of: UNDERSTANDING THE CRYSTAL PEOPLE: A Handbook For Lightworkers – click here

 

 

Click here to read about how to dig your own crystal in Arkansas

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